I MOVE THAT WE GO ON A GENERAL STRIKE

“I have listened to all the speakers,” she said. “I would not have further patience for talk, as I am one of those who feels and suffers from the things pictured.

“I move that we go on a general strike.”

The audience stood and roared its assent. In the days that followed, 20,000 to 40,000 workers, women and men, went on strike. They were backed by wealthy patrons, many of them suffragists, who provided bail money and small stipends. In February 1910, most of the factories agreed to recognize the Women’s Trade Union League as the representative for the workers.

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About Chris Weagel

Chris Weagel writes about the intersection of technology and parenting for Wired Magazine. No he doesn’t. He can’t stand that shit.

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